Utilisation équitable

Éducation Québec Utilisation équitable

Pistes pour le droit d’auteur en milieu scolaire et universitaire

Voici quelques liens pour encadrer le droit d’auteur dans le milieu de l’éducation :

Le concept global constitut établir un cadre de gouvernance misant sur les forces du service du contentieux et de la bibliothèque pour travailler en collaboration.

Livre et édition Pétition Québec Utilisation équitable

Why I’m withdrawing from Copibec’s class-action suit against Université Laval (traduction)

(English post will start just after this blockquote.)

FR: Voici une traduction effectuée par l’Association canadienne des professeures et professeurs d’universités (dont je suis membre) du billet diffusé le 8 septembre 2017, intitulé « Pourquoi je vais me retirer du recours collectiv de Copibec contre l’Université Laval »

EN: This is a translation by the Canadian Associaiton of University Teachers (of which I am a member) of a post I wrote on September 8th on this blog.

As the author of published works, I qualify as a party to the class-action lawsuit brought by Copibec against Université Laval. That said, I plan to sign the opt-out form that will remove me from the class action and send it to both the registrar of the court and Copibec’s mailing address before October 15.

I’d like to put forward some of the reasons behind my decision, and which I hope will stand in support of Université Laval.

Before I continue, I invite the rest of the university community to join me in withdrawing from the class-action suit. All you need to do is complete the form provided on Copibec’s website and send it to the court clerk. The mailing address is on the form:

http://copibec.ca/medias/files/Action_collective/Formulaire-exclusion.pdf

I have two reasons for opting out: 1) the suit ignores the business realities of the academic setting and 2) it constitutes a severe breach of academic freedom and intellectual freedom, which are intertwined with freedom of expression.


1. Business realities of academic publishing

 

Despite Copibec’s complaints against Laval, in 2014-15, the institution spent $12.6 million on documents for its library, surpassed only by McGill University ($18.9 million).

Here’s a broader context: Quebec universities as a whole spent more than $63 million on library acquisitions, whereas the grand total for universities across Canada stands at $311 million. Public libraries in Quebec dished out roughly $30 million, and Quebec households bought more than $1 billion in books, newspapers and magazines. In 2012-13, more than two thirds of these expenditures (70% in Quebec) were for digital collections. What’s more, because digital sources now gobble up such a huge portion of annual acquisition budgets, the BCI no longer distinguishes between print and digital in its annual statistics.

The basic difference between a print collection and a digital one is easy to understand. Digital collections are acquired under a licence agreement that specifies usage rights, such as photocopying the material and sharing it with students through learning management systems. Print collections are governed by copyright law and by the licences of copyright-management collectives. Over the past few years, scientific publishers have in fact offered digital bundles for collections that institutions already have in hard-copy format—especially for scientific journals. Yes, university libraries have repurchased a significant portion of their existing print collections in digital format.

As a result, the proportion of print material(requiring a Copibec licence) of regular acquisitions is dwindling in the average Québec university library. In contrast, digital acquisitions, which require a licence similar to what Copibec offers, are booming. This new reality means that access rights, introduced by the Harper government in 2012 , are bundled, through licences, with digital works.

In fact, consumers of digital content are in the same boat: all platforms offering copyright-protected works in digital format always do so after having agreed to a digital licence. Reading a book on Kindle? You’ve said yes to Amazon. Same thing for Netflix, iTunes, Google Play, Steam… Consumers can simply glance over the terms of these licences but information professionals – your librarians, library technicians and clerks behind the scenes–well, they read and negotiate them on your behalf.

Let’s summarize the situation using the following equation, regardless of format or type of content:

Use = document + rights

 

In the print world, the equation was as follows:

Course packs sold to students = a university library’s print collection + Copibec licence

 

In the world of digital scholarly publishing, the reality that I experience and have studied is:

Use = digital document directly from the publisher + usage licence directly from the publisher

(Remember that libraries have transitioned to digital collections and acquire these in massive numbers.)

Note that without the publisher’s licence, it’s IMPOSSIBLE to acquire a digital resource. You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to understand that, for the average Quebec university, a licence with Copibec IS WORTH NEXT TO NOTHING. Why? Because the percentage of works offered in our licensed collections (that is, digital) is skyrocketing.

What’s more, I think Université Laval is one of the only Quebec universities to have done any rigorous “library economics” homework. All of the other universities in the province are passing along the cost of Copibec’s licence to their students, through ancillary fees, so they don’t see the urgency of challenging the current copyright orthodoxy.

If I were so bold as to summarize Copibec’s position, the fundamental equation for library-based access to works would be as follows:

Use = document comes from who knows where, and maybe from what’s left in the paper collection + copyright infringement through the fair dealing exception.

This assertion comes from a fairy tale that doesn’t reflect what I experience at work every day. My doctoral research, based on empirical analyses, confirms what I’m seeing at work.

Indeed, resorting to the principle of “fair dealings” is itself an exception, and to get back to the rocket-scientist analogy, a diligent and reasonable rights holder would immediately grasp its clients’ interest for digital material and put forward a palatable solution… Digitizing a work costs money. Consider all of the universities that digitize works on the fly to tap into the concept of fair dealings as an exception to copyright. The copyright holder could digitize everything in one fell swoop and sell the same copy to every university … around the world! That’s one of the secret formulas of the world’s biggest academic publishers.

If the Canadian government adopted a full slate of exceptions in the 2012 Copyright Act, it also assigned a new right to rights holders: making material available online. Quebec’s universities, especially Laval, diligently kept pace with the world of academic publishing in embracing digital formats. I don’t think Laval is at fault here, but I do think that Copibec, in reality, is defending a sort of commercial sloth. In addition, I believe the cultural sector is transposing its own reality on that of academia. The market failures and externalities of one sector are not the same as in others, even though copyright governs them all.

In fact, it would be more relevant to consider fair dealings as the public sector’s investment in mastering the workings of the markets and of the social systems generated by the digital world. University libraries, together with professors, students, techno-educators and other partners, are analyzing the needs of their clienteles and are trying to establish economic and social systems around digital works. We then transfer this knowledge to the industry through negotiated licence agreements or through exceptions. In both cases, opportunity knocks for whoever understands the message and adjusts accordingly. Copibec should put forward a business deal that considers our needs—suing libraries points to a woeful misunderstanding of the powerful trends affecting university markets and the academic publishing sector.

What happened to the horse when the automobile was invented…? Darwin and Shumpeter can shed some light on that.

This isn’t only my professional assessment of the situation, but also the conclusion of my doctoral thesis (which I’ll be defending on September 15).

 

2. Academic and intellectual freedom: integral parts of freedom of expression

 

I developed the link between academic and intellectual freedom and freedom of expression in a book chapter dealing with open access, available at Concordia University’s Research Repository, and which was published in the Handbook of Intellectual Freedom. All of the authors of this work won awards for their contributions from the Intellectual Freedom Round Table of the American Library Association. Here is an excerpt from my chapter:

 

There is a clear consensus in the literature that intellectual freedom is directly linked with freedom of expression, the press and to access and use information and that it is a core value of librarianship. Gorman famously stated that:

In the United States, [intellectual freedom] is constitutionally protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution, which states, in part, ‘Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging freedom of speech, or of the press.’ There is, of course, no such thing as an absolute freedom outside the pages of fiction and utopian writings, and, for that reason, intellectual freedom is constrained by law in every jurisdiction.” (2000, p. 88)

Gorman continues to state that rarely are proponents “for” or “against” intellectual freedom, but they articulate their views in absolute or relative terms. On these issues, Hauptman (2002 pp. 16-29) as well as and McMenemy, Poulter and Burton (2007) offer additional evidence and insight. The link between intellectual freedom and censorship is obvious.

Intellectual freedom is also linked with Article 19 of the United Nation’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which states:

Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.” (1948)

Samek (2007, pp. 9-11) provides an account of how various groups, such as United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) have further articulated the concept of intellectual freedom in various initiatives and declarations.

Barendt offers an interesting distinction between academic freedom, a well-known right professors enjoy in universities, and intellectual freedom:

[a] cademic freedom is not identical to intellectual freedom or to freedom of the mind. Intellectual freedom is a right to which we are all entitled, wherever we work. Like freedom of speech or expression, it is a general right belonging to all citizens.” (2010, p. 38)

In discussing how intellectual freedom and freedom of expression are intertwined, Krug further articulates, in light of librarianship, that:

All people have the right to hold any belief or idea on any subject and to express those beliefs or ideas in whatever form they consider appropriate. The ability to express an idea or a belief is meaningless, however, unless there is an equal commitment to the right of unrestricted access to information and ideas regardless of the communication medium. Intellectual freedom, then, is the right to express one’s ideas and the right of others to be able to read, hear or view them.” (2006, p. 394-5)

From these points, we can draw a common thread for intellectual freedom, namely that it is universal in enshrining our right to access and use information. In light of this, intellectual freedom intersects or overlaps with open access in that the former is promoted as a way to maximize or optimize access to and use of digital documents and information, while the latter expresses a fundamental right of the same vein.

I believe that Copibec’s suit, despite its legality from a strictly legal point of view, illegitimately and inordinately undermines our fundamental rights.

 

3. Supporting statistics 

 

—In 2014-15, Québec universities spent just under $70 million on library acquisitions (source: BCI).

—Canadian university libraries spent more than $311 million on acquisitions (source: CARL/ABRC 2014/15).

—In comparison, Québec households spent $657 million on books ($3 billion across Canada) and $417 million on newspapers and periodicals (just under $2 billion across Canada) in 2015 (source: Statistics Canada. Table 384-0041 – Detailed household final consumption expenditure provincial and territorial – annual (dollars)) CANSIM (socioeconomic data base). Site consulted on September 7, 2017.

—Percentage of acquisitions in digital format: 2012-2013 was the last year in which the library sub-committee of the Bureau de coopération interuniversitaire distinguished between digital and print acquisitions, with roughly three quarters of expenditures going to digital at the time. That proportion has increased steadily since (take my word for it, a librarian with more than 14 years’ experience).

 

4. Sources

 

Barendt, E. M. 2010. Academic freedom and the law: A comparative study. Oxford; Portland, Or.: Hart Pub.

Gorman, Michael. 2000. Our enduring values: Librarianship in the 21st century. Chicago: American Library Association.

Hauptman: forward of Buchanan, Elizabeth A., and Kathrine Henderson, eds. 2009. Case studies in library and information science ethics. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Co.

Krug, Judith F. 2006. Libraries and the Internet. Chap. 7.3, In Intellectual freedom manual, ed. Office for Intellectual Freedom. 7th ed., 394. Chicago: American Library Association.

McMenemy, David, Alan Poulter and Paul F. Burton. A handbook of ethical practice: a practical guide to dealing with ethical issues in information and library work. Oxford: Chandos, 2007.

Samek, Toni. 2007. Librarianship and human rights: A twenty-first century guide. Oxford, England: Chandos.

Exceptions au droit d'auteur Livre et édition Pétition Québec Revendication Utilisation équitable

Pourquoi je vais m’exclure du recours collectif de Copibec c. l’Université Laval

À titre d’auteur de textes publiés, je me qualifie comme membre au recours collectif de Copibec c. l’Université Laval. Je vais envoyer le formulaire de désistement pour m’exclure du recours collectif au greffier de la cour et à l’adresse de Copibec avant le 15 octobre. Je désire, dans les paragraphes qui suivent, expliquer quelques arguments qui motivent mon geste, que je désire être un appui envers l’Université Laval.

Avant de continuer, j’invite la communauté universitaire à se joindre à moi et de s’exclure du recours collectif. Pour ce faire, il suffit d’envoyer formulaire disponible sur le site de Copibec au greffier de la cour – l’adresse postale y est indiquée:

http://copibec.ca/medias/files/Action_collective/Formulaire-exclusion.pdf

Mon geste est motivé par deux raisons : ce recours ignore des réalités commerciales du milieu académique et s’avère une entrave sévère à la liberté intellectuelle et académique, des dimensions de la liberté d’expression.

1. Réalités commerciales de l’édition académique

Malgré ce que Copibec reproche à l’Université Laval, celle-ci a dépensé en 2014-15 pour 12,6 millions de dollars en sources documentaires, dépassée au Québec uniquement par McGill (à 18,9 millions de dollars). À titre de référence, les universités du Québec ont dépensé plus de 63 millions de dollars en ressources documentaires, tandis que le montant s’élève à 311 millions pour toutes celles du Canada. Quant à elles, les bibliothèques publiques du Québec dépensent une trentaine de millions de dollars et les ménages québécois dépensent plus d’un milliard en livres, journaux et revues. Plus des deux tiers de ces fonds servaient (70% pour le Québec), en 2012-2013, à l’acquisition de collections numériques (le BCI ne distingue plus entre l’imprimé et le numérique dans ses statistiques annuelles tant le numérique prend la part du lion des budgets d’acquisition).

La différence fondamentale entre une collection imprimée et une collection numérique est simple à comprendre. Une collection numérique est acquise sous licence, où sont stipulés les droits d’utilisation comme la photocopie et la diffusion aux étudiants par les environnements d’apprentissage numérique. Pour l’imprimé, il faut se fier à la loi et aux licences des sociétés de gestion collective. Ces dernières années, les éditeurs scientifiques ont par ailleurs offert des bouquets numériques des collections déjà acquises en format papier – surtout pour les revues scientifiques. Oui, les bibliothèques universitaires ont acheté de nouveau en numérique une partie non-négligeable de ce qu’elles possédaient déjà en format papier.

Ainsi, la proportion de l’imprimé (nécessitant une licence Copibec) fond dans les acquisitions régulières d’une bibliothèque universitaire québécoise moyenne. La part du numérique, acquis avec une licence qui s’apparente à ce que Copibec offre, explose. Et la nouvelle donne implique que le droit d’accès, introduit par le législateur en 2012 au profit de l’industrie, s’opère avec une licence pour utiliser une œuvre numérique.

En fait, le consommateur de contenu numérique vit la même réalité : toutes les plateformes offrant des œuvres protégées par le droit d’auteur en format numérique le font toujours après avoir consenti à une licence numérique. Vous lisez un livre sur Kindle? Vous avez dit oui à Amazon. Idem pour Netflix, iTunes, Google Play, Steam… Les citoyens ont le loisir d’ignorer les termes de ces licences, les professionnels de l’information – vos bibliothécaires, technicien.ne.s en documentation et commis qui travaillent dans l’ombre – elles, les lisent et les négocient en votre nom.

Résumons la situation avec l’équation suivante. Peu importe le format ou le type de contenu :

Utilisation = document + droit

 

Dans le monde papier, l’équation était :

Recueils de cours vendus aux étudiants =
collection papier d’une bibliothèque universitaire
+ licence Copibec

Dans le monde de l’édition savante numérique, la réalité que je vis et que j’ai étudiée est :

Utilisation =
document numérique directement de l’éditeur
+ licence d’utilisation directement de l’éditeur
(Souvenez-vous que les bibliothèques ont migré leurs collections vers le numérique et acquièrent massivement des collections numériques)

Notez que sans la licence d’utilisation de l’éditeur, il est IMPOSSIBLE d’acquérir un document numérique. Il ne faut pas la tête à Papineau pour comprendre que la valeur d’une licence avec Copibec, pour une université québécoise moyenne TEND VERS ZÉRO. Pourquoi? Car la proportion d’œuvres proposées dans nos collections sous licence (donc, numériques) explose. En fait, je crois que l’Université Laval est l’une des seules universités québécoises à avoir effectué un travail bibliothéconomique rigoureux. Toutes les autres universités québécoises refilent la facture de la licence Copibec aux étudiants par les frais afférents, donc l’urgence d’attaquer la doxa dominante du droit d’auteur ne se fait pas sentir.

Si j’ose résumer la position de Copibec, l’équation fondamentale de l’accès en bibliothèque serait :

Utilisation =
le document vient d’on ne sait où, peut-être de ce qui reste de la collection papier
+ usurpation des droits d’auteurs par l’utilisation équitable

Cette affirmation comporte une belle fiction qui ne reflète pas la réalité quotidienne de mon travail. Mes recherches doctorales confirment par une analyse empirique ce que je vis au travail.

En fait, le recours à l’utilisation équitable est en soit une exception! Encore évoquant la tête à l’illustre Papineau, un titulaire diligent et raisonnable aura vite compris l’intérêt de ses clients pour le numérique et aurait dû travailler à offrir une solution intéressante… Numériser une œuvre coûte des sous. Imaginez toutes ces universités qui numérisent à la volée dans le cadre d’une exception au droit d’auteur comme l’utilisation équitable – le titulaire pourrait numériser une seule fois et revendre la même copie à toutes les universités… du monde! Il s’agit là d’une des recettes secrètes des gros éditeurs savants du monde.
Si le Parlement Canadien a édicté une panoplie de nouvelles exceptions dans la Loi sur le droit d’auteur en 2012, il a également édicté un nouveau droit au profit des titulaires : celui de rendre accessible dans Internet. Les universités du Québec – et surtout l’Université Laval – ont diligemment suivi le pas du monde de l’édition savante pour embrasser le numérique. Je crois que la faute ne repose pas sur les épaules de l’Université Laval mais que Copibec plaide, en réalité, une forme de turpitude commerciale. De plus, je crois que le milieu culturel transpose sa propre réalité à celle du monde académique. Les externalités et défaillances de marché d’un domaine ne sont pas les mêmes que dans l’autre, bien que le droit d’auteur les gouverne tous.

Il serait plus pertinent de comprendre l’utilisation équitable comme un investissement de la part du secteur public dans l’appropriation des ficelles des marchés et systèmes sociaux qui émergent du numérique. Les bibliothèques universitaires, de concert avec les professeurs, étudiants, technopédagogues et autres collaborateurs, analysent les besoins de leurs clientèles et tentent d’organiser les systèmes économiques et sociaux autour des œuvres numériques. Nous transférons cette connaissance à l’industrie par le biais de licences négociées ou par les exceptions. Dans les deux cas, l’opportunité appartient à celle qui capte le message et s’adapte en conséquence. Copibec devrait proposer une offre commerciale en lien avec nos besoins – actionner les bibliothèques démontre une incompréhension désolante des tendances lourdes du milieu de l’édition savante et des marchés universitaires.

Qu’a fait le cheval face à l’avènement de l’automobile…? Darwin et Schumpeter offrent des pistes de solutions.

Il ne s’agit pas juste de mon évaluation professionnelle de la situation, mais de la conclusion de ma thèse doctorale (que je défendrai le 15 septembre prochain).

2. Liberté intellectuelle et académique, une dimension de la liberté d’expression

J’ai développé le lien entre la liberté intellectuelle, académique et la liberté d’expression dans un chapitre de livre traitant du libre accès, disponible dans le dépôt institutionnel de l’Université Concordia, qui fut publié dans le Handbook of Intellectual Freedom. Tous les auteurs de cette monographie furent primés pour leur travail par la Intellectual Freedom Round Table de la American Library Association. Dans ce texte, je dis:

There is a clear consensus in the literature that intellectual freedom is directly linked with freedom of expression, the press and to access and use information and that it is a core value of librarianship. Gorman famously stated that:

“In the United-States, [intellectual freedom] is constitutionally protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution, which states, in part, “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging freedom of speech, or of the press.” There is, of course, no such thing as an absolute freedom outside the pages of fiction and utopian writings, and, for that reason, intellectual freedom is constrained by law in every jurisdiction.” (2000, p. 88)

Gorman continues to state that rarely are proponents “for” or “against” intellectual freedom, but they articulate their views in absolute or relative terms. On these issues, Hauptman (2002 p. 16-29) as well as and McMenemy, Poulter and Burton (2007) offer additional evidence and insight. The link between intellectual freedom and censorship is obvious.

Intellectual freedom is also linked with Article 19 of the United Nation’s Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which states:

“Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.” (1948)

Samek (2007, p. 9-11) provides an account of how various groups, such as United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) have further articulated the concept of intellectual freedom in various initiatives and declarations.

Barendt offers an interesting distinction between academic freedom, a well-known right professors enjoy in universities, and intellectual freedom:

“[a]cademic freedom is not identical to intellectual freedom or to freedom of the mind. Intellectual freedom is a right to which we are all entitled, wherever we work. Like freedom of speech or expression, it is a general right belonging to all citizens.” (2010, p. 38)

In discussing how intellectual freedom and freedom of expression are intertwined, Krug further articulates, in light of librarianship, that:

“all people have the right to hold any belief or idea on any subject and to express those beliefs or ideas in whatever form they consider appropriate. The ability to express an idea or a belief is meaningless, however, unless there is an equal commitment to the right of unrestricted access to information and ideas regardless of the communication medium. Intellectual freedom, then, is the right to express one’s ideas and the right of others to be able to read, hear or view them.” (2006, p. 394-5)

From these points, we can draw a common thread for intellectual freedom, namely that it is universal in enshrining our right to access and use information. In light of this, intellectual freedom intersects or overlaps with open access in that the former is promoted as a way to maximize or optimize access and use of digital documents and information while the latter expresses a fundamental right of the same vein.

Je crois que l’action de Copibec, bien que conforme sur le strict point de vue légal, impose un fardeau démesuré et illégitime à nos droits fondamentaux.

3. Annexe statistiques

– Les Universités québécoises, par le biais de leurs bibliothèques, ont dépensé un peu moins de 70 millions de dollars pour l’acquisition de ressources documentaires en 2014-15. (source : BCI)

– Les bibliothèques universitaires canadiennes ont dépensé plus de 311 millions de dollars en acquisitions documentaires (source : CARL/ABRC 2014/15)

– Pour comparer, les ménages québécois ont dépensé 657 millions de dollars en livres (3 milliards au Canada) et 417 millions de dollars en journaux et publications périodiques (un peu moins de 2 milliards an Canada) en 2015 (source : Statistique Canada. Tableau 384-0041 – Dépenses de consommation finale des ménages détaillées, provinciaux et territoriaux, annuel (dollars), CANSIM (base de données). (site consulté : le 7 septembre 2017)

– Pourcentage d’acquisitions en format numérique : L’année 2012-2013 fut la dernière où le sous-comité des bibliothèques du Bureau de coopération interuniversitaire distinguait les dépenses pour les sources numériques et l’imprimé. Il s’élève alors à près du trois-quarts pour le numérique. La part du numérique ne cesse d’augmenter depuis, parole de bibliothécaire universitaire avec plus de 14 ans de métier.

 

4. Sources

Barendt, E. M. 2010. Academic freedom and the law : A comparative study. Oxford ; Portland, Or.: Hart Pub.

Gorman, Michael. 2000. Our enduring values : Librarianship in the 21st century. Chicago: American Library Association.

Hauptman: préface de Buchanan, Elizabeth A., and Kathrine Henderson, eds. 2009. Case studies in library and information science ethics. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland & Co.

Krug, Judith F. 2006. Libraries and the internet. Chap. 7.3, In Intellectual freedom manual, ed. Office for Intellectual Freedom. 7th ed., 394. Chicago: American Library Association.

McMenemy, David, Alan Poulter and Paul F. Burton. A handbook of ethical practice : a practical guide to dealing with ethical issues in information and library work. Oxford : Chandos, 2007.

Samek, Toni. 2007. Librarianship and human rights : A twenty-first century guide. Oxford, England: Chandos.

 

Canada Droit d'auteur Enseignant Rapport et étude Utilisation équitable

Outil pour le droit d’auteur en milieu scolaire

Le Conseil des ministres de l’éducation (Canada), groupe qui n’inclut pas le Québec, annonce le lancement d’une nouvelle ressource numérique pour épauler les enseignants du « Rest-Of-Canada » (ou ROC pour les intimes) à comprendre le droit d’auteur. Intitulée « http://www.outildecisiondroitdauteur.ca/ » ce site :

aide les enseignantes et enseignants à déterminer s’ils peuvent ou non, en vertu de la disposition de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur qui porte sur l’utilisation équitable, utiliser des œuvres protégées sans avoir à obtenir la permission du titulaire du droit d’auteur.

Le but de CMEC est simple :

Le personnel enseignant et les élèves ont aujourd’hui plus de possibilités d’apprendre en classe grâce à la décision de la Cour suprême du Canada rendue en 2012, laquelle clarifie le sens donné à l’utilisation équitable en classe La disposition sur l’utilisation équitable permet au personnel enseignant de communiquer ou d’utiliser pour les élèves de leurs classes de « courts extraits » d’œuvres protégées sans avoir à demander la permission du titulaire du droit d’auteur ou à payer des redevances. Depuis 2012, le milieu de l’éducation au Canada suit les Lignes directrices sur l’utilisation équitable, qui décrivent, à la lumière des décisions de la Cour suprême du Canada, ce que sont de « courts extraits ».

J’ai parcouru le site outildecisiondroitdauteur.ca et l’idée est bonne – celle de proposer un arbre de décision afin d’élucider si oui on non il est possible d’utiliser une oeuvre. Ceci dit, il aurait été plus pertinent de déconstruire le contexte scolaire afin de présenter l’information selon la perspective des utilisateurs. Par exemple, la terminologie utilisée est très axée sur les mots de la loi et il manque d’exemples…

C’est un peu ce que nous avons tenté de faire dans le cadre du Chantier sur le droit d’auteur de l’Association pour la promotion des services documentaires scolaires (APSDS). Notre Foire aux questions sur le droit d’auteur en milieu scolaire du Québec (auquel j’avais contribué) tente de présenter ce qui est licite ou non dans un contexte scolaire en fonction des licences de sociétés de gestion collectives et l’état actuel des politique institutionnelles sur le droit d’auteur.

Dans tous les cas, la resource de CMEC s’ajoute à la publication d’une trentaine de pages, déjà à sa 4e édition, intitulée Le droit d’auteur ça compte (pdf).

Au Québec, le ministère de l’éducation propose un site sur le droit d’auteur.

Conférence CultureLibre.ca Non classé Utilisation équitable

Notes concernant les questions de droit d’auteur en services d’archive et en bibliothèque

Je vous propose ici quelques réflexions et lectures concernant le droit d’auteur dans les bibliothèques. Je vais intervenir dans le cours de Marie Demoulin à l’EBSI ce vendredi et, fidèle à mon habitude, je consigne mes notes ici.

Avant de poursuivre, j’ai une série de billets sur le sujet du droit d’auteur sur mon carnet outfind.ca (en anglais) que j’utilise dans le cadre de mes interventions à l’Université Concordia (mon employeur – les cours s’y donnent en anglais j’ai donc besoin d’un carnet dans cette langue aussi). Si vous avez soif pour plus, jetez-y un coup d’oeil…

1. Le droit d’auteur, du point de vue institutionnel, découle d’un choix

J’entend souvent dire que le droit d’auteur est un sujet complexe. En réalité, la complexité découle du fait que nous avons perdu nos repères traditionnels à cause de l’avènement du numérique. Nous devons revisiter les prémisses de nos pratiques professionnelles découlant de l’ère « papier » pour les appliquer à l’environnement numérique et au contexte juridique actuel. La complexité ne découle pas du grand nombre d’options quant au respect du droit d’auteur mais d’une absence de moyen pour opérer un choix. D’ailleurs, ce choix ce fait traditionnellement en réseau et notre milieu souffre d’un éparpillement associatif.

J’ai eu la chance de réfléchir aux choix en lien avec le droit d’auteur à travers le Chantier sur le droit d’auteur en milieu scolaire . J’ai épaulé des collègues chevronnée qui ont bâti un outil pour appréhender le système du droit d’auteur : cette réflexion nous a mené à proposer une Foire aux questions sur le droit d’auteur en milieu scolaire de l’Association pour l’avancement des sciences et techniques de la documentation en milieu scolaire (APSDS). Je vous propose ce graphique qui explique sommairement les choix qui découlent au droit d’auteur :

 

2. Le choix doit s’opérer selon une matrice oeuvre-utilisation

Je manque de temps pour expliquer cette idée, mais constatez comment nous avons organisé notre travail dans la Foire aux questions de l’APSDS – nous avons pris des classes de documents et nous avons effectué un remu-méninges pour lister tous les contextes d’utilisation. Ainsi, nous avons établi une « matrice » oeuvre-utilisation, où les lignes sont les classes de documents et où les colonnes sont les types d’utilisation. Pour chaque « cellule » ou instance oeuvre-utilisation, nous avons déterminé lequel des choix nous devons opérer pour atteindre une utilisation légale.

C’est un peu la recette de ma sauce secrète que j’utilise à chaque fois que je travaille avec une question de droit d’auteur.

Commerce et Compagnies Contenu culturel Droits des citoyens Exceptions au droit d'auteur Films Québec Réforme Utilisation équitable

La question des films en bibliothèque et dans les établissements d’enseignement

Une des théories sur laquelle j’ai beaucoup travaillé est de comprendre le rôle des bibliothèques dans le contexte du droit d’auteur. En fait, il s’agit de mon objectif principal de recherche de ma thèse doctorale (que je compte diffuser dans Internet dès ma soutenance – donc dans très peu de temps). Malgré que l’existence des bibliothèques précède de loin la stipulation des premières règles du droit d’auteur (par quelques millénaires en fait), je crois avoir démontré que les bibliothèques constituent des institutions à part entières jouant un rôle socio-économique de premier ordre dans les marchés et systèmes d’oeuvres numériques protégées par le droit d’auteur.

Une évolution organique où diverses institutions (bibliothèques, marchés d’oeuvres, « machine » littéraire et culturelle) convergent et amène l’émergence (ou réification) de nouvelles façon de faire. Cela confirme, entre autre, l’importance des budgets d’acquisitions documentaires des universités, municipalités, hôpitaux, commissions scolaires… mais aussi du rôle essentiel des exceptions au droit d’auteur.

La dualité budget-exceptions amène une relation d’amour-haine (au Québec, du moins) envers les bibliothèques… qui est bien sûr absolument ironique. Comme le soulignait hier l’Association des bibliothèques de recherche du Canada dans une déclaration concernant l’utilisation équitable:

Au cours des douze dernières années, la Cour suprême du Canada a écrit à profusion sur l’utilisation appropriée de l’exception relative à l’utilisation équitable en vertu de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur, en privilégiant une interprétation « large et équitable ». Cette approche équilibrée de gestion des droits d’auteur a été bien accueillie partout dans le milieu de l’enseignement supérieur et les bibliothèques universitaires canadiennes appliquent la disposition relative à l’utilisation équitable de la Loi sur le droit d’auteur de manière éclairée et responsable.

Les 31 établissements membres de l’Association des bibliothèques de recherche du Canada (ABRC) ont investi 293 millions de dollars dans les ressources en information en 2014-2015, démontrant ainsi leur engagement manifeste à accéder au contenu imprimé et numérique dans la légalité et à rémunérer les détenteurs de droit d’auteur en conséquence.

Oui, les bibliothèques ont droit à des exceptions au droit d’auteur et, oui, elles investissent dans les marchés issus du droit d’auteur. L’ironie, que les titulaires ne semblent pas comprendre, c’est que même si toutes les bibliothèques invoquent les exceptions au droit d’auteur pour opérer leurs services, il sera toujours plus efficace (du point de vue économique et social) pour elles de faire affaire avec les titulaires. Pourquoi? Simple: c’est une question de coût marginal. Le coût pour une institution documentaire d’opérer un service basé sur des exceptions au droit d’auteur de pourra jamais battre le coût marginal de production d’une énième copie (numérique ou non) d’une oeuvre pour le titulaire.

C’est pourquoi il faut concevoir les exceptions du droit d’auteur non pas comme un coût que doit subir le titulaire mais, plutôt comme un investissement dans son oeuvre. Il faut lire la première partie de ma thèse pour voir les sources en théorie économique de ma démonstration… je m’arrête ici car cette longue introduction risque de me détourner de l’objectif premier de ce billet, c’est à dire de l’exception concernant les oeuvres cinématographiques dans un contexte éducatif.

Il se dit beaucoup de choses concernant l’obligation pour les bibliothèques quant à l’acquisition e films pour leur collection. Il s’en dit encore plus concernant la diffusion de films en classe. Depuis l’entrée en vigueur de C-11 qui modernisa la Loi sur le droit d’auteur, les établissements d’enseignements disposent d’une nouvelle exception. Parlons-en, donc, de ces deux points. Et j’en ajoute un troisième, que j’intitule: ce que ferais si j’étais titulaire de droits sur des films pour travailler de concert avec les bibliothèques.

1. Est-ce qu’une bibliothèque est tenue d’acquérir une copie d’un film avec des droits d’exécution au public ?

NON. Une bibliothèque peut simplement commander via son détaillant préféré une copie régulière, grand public, d’un film pour sa collection, une copie usagée même, voire un don. Rien dans la loi sur le droit d’auteur n’impose quelconque obligation quant à l’approvisionnement de films pour sa collection et pour le prêt à ses usagers.

En fait, l’acquisition du livre est règlementé au Québec, pas les films.

Sur la question de la responsabilité civile des bibliothécaires et des institutions documentaires quant à ses services et ses collections, je vous invite à lire l’excellent article de Nicolas Vermeys dans Documentation et bibliothèque :

Auteur : Me Nicolas Vermeys
Titre : Le cadre juridique réservé aux bibliothèques numériques
Revue : Documentation et bibliothèques, Volume 59, numéro 3, juillet-septembre 2013, p. 146-154
URI : http://www.erudit.org/revue/documentation/2013/v59/n3/
DOI : 10.7202/1018844ar

Alors, pourquoi la pratique d’acquérir une version incluant les droits d’exécution au public (à fort coût pour ses maigres budgets) est-elle si répandue parmi les bibliothèques? Simplement parce que les institutions documentaires desservant les communautés des établissements d’enseignements (et il y en a quand même beaucoup) se faisaient souvent demander d’acquérir une copie d’un film avec les droits d’exécution au public (ou en anglais, les public performance rights ou PPR) afin de faciliter la diffusion en classe. Et lentement, mais sûrement, la connaissance formelle d’une chose s’embrouille avec le temps qui court, pour s’obscurcir et devenir coutume ou légende… et on est obligé de consacrer 7 ans de sa vie à faire un doctorat en droit pour pouvoir éclairer ses collègues avec un savoir clair et lumineux (mais ne vous en faites pas pour moi, ce parcours ne fut pas que souffrance !!)

Donc, toute copie de film licite peut être ajoutée à nos collection, droit d’exécution au public ou non. Et elle peut circuler comme bon nous semble. Alors, qu’en est-il de cette nouvelle exception au droit d’auteur ?

2. L’exception pour la diffusion des films en classe

En fait, j’ai travaillé plus de deux ans avec les collègues de l’Association pour la promotion des services documentaires en milieu scolaire (APSDS) pour l’élaboration d’une foire au question sur le droit d’auteur, et on en parle de cette exception. Mais, rien ne vaut la lecture, à tête reposée, notre bonne vieille Loi sur le droit d’auteur !

Êtes-vous prêts ? La voici la fameuse exception, fraichement copiée-collée de mon site préféré de diffusion libre du droit, CanLII.org:

Art. 29.5

Représentations

 Ne constituent pas des violations du droit d’auteur les actes ci-après, s’ils sont accomplis par un établissement d’enseignement ou une personne agissant sous l’autorité de celui-ci, dans les locaux de celui-ci, à des fins pédagogiques et non en vue d’un profit, devant un auditoire formé principalement d’élèves de l’établissement, d’enseignants agissant sous l’autorité de l’établissement ou d’autres personnes qui sont directement responsables de programmes d’études pour cet établissement :

  • a) l’exécution en direct et en public d’une oeuvre, principalement par des élèves de l’établissement;

  • b) l’exécution en public tant de l’enregistrement sonore que de l’oeuvre ou de la prestation qui le constituent, à condition que l’enregistrement ne soit pas un exemplaire contrefait ou que la personne qui l’exécute n’ait aucun motif raisonnable de croire qu’il s’agit d’un exemplaire contrefait;

  • c) l’exécution en public d’une oeuvre ou de tout autre objet du droit d’auteur lors de leur communication au public par télécommunication;

  • d) l’exécution en public d’une oeuvre cinématographique, à condition que l’oeuvre ne soit pas un exemplaire contrefait ou que la personne qui l’exécute n’ait aucun motif raisonnable de croire qu’il s’agit d’un exemplaire contrefait.

  • 1997, ch. 24, art. 18;
  • 2012, ch. 20, art. 24.

(Nous soulignons)

Constatez que vous pouvez « jouer » un film, de la musique ou montrer une image dans un établissement d’enseignement si les quatre conditions du préambule que j’ai mis en caractère gras, sont présentes. Donc, il faut que ça se passe à l’école, pour l’école, par l’école et pour les élèves et gens de l’école. Et ne pas faire de profits. Et lier le film aux activités pédagogiques. Si vous faites ça, pas de troubles, pas d’autorisation, pas de droit d’exécution au public.

Par contre, si vous voulez organiser une levée de fonds pour une parade de mode en montrant un film récent à l’école, l’exception ne s’applique pas. Il serait difficile de prétendre que l’exécution en public est pour des fins pédagogiques puisque on veut lever des fonds! Par contre, on pourrait vouloir conscientiser la communauté étudiante en diffusant un documentaire récent, faire un panel de discussion avec des intervenants et demander une contribution volontaire aux participants pour faire un don à un organisme local. C’est déjà plus proche de l’objectif pédagogique et on ne vise pas faire un profit (il y a une distinction fondamentale entre des revenus et des profits, mais là, c’est une autre histoire).

3. La solution pour les titulaires: la diffusion en flux (streaming)… et l’innovation technico-légale!

J’entend déjà les titulaires se lamenter : « maudites bibliothèques | écoles | universités qui nous usurpent nos oeuvres et attaquent nos maigres revenus !  Encore l’État qui prend mon bien ! » Il ne faut pas prêter oreille à de telles jérémiades. Je vous offre cette formule lapidaire car cette position, trop répandue au Québec, démontre un manque absurde de nuance et une incompréhension du le potentiel économique de l’intervention des institutions sociales. En pâtit la valeur de l’oeuvre et notre richesse collective.

Constatez ces mots: valeur et richesse. En économie (néolibérale classique), la valeur d’un bien découle directement de son prix dans un marché équilibré, lire ici de commodités parfaites. La richesse est un concept plus large, qui évoque le potentiel économique d’un bien. Si le français offre une nuance aux concepts de libre et de gratuit, qui rend jaloux les anglophones de la communauté des logiciels et de la culture libre, la langue anglaise offre une distinction fondamentale entre value et wealth – que je traduit imparfaitement par valeur et richesse.

L’idée fondamentale est que l’oeuvre protégée par le droit d’auteur est un bien économique très particulier. Il épouse les caractéristiques économiques d’un bien public (non-rival et non-exclusif), ce qui implique que son coût de reproduction est quasiment nul et qu’un marché peut difficilement émerger. D’où l’importance du droit d’auteur et, en tant que capitaliste pragmatique mais voué à l’économie sociale, j’y crois dur comme fer au droit d’auteur. Mais l’analyse économique ne s’arrête pas là.

Outre les problèmes de l’émergence de marchés et l’élaboration des prix, les oeuvres protégées par le droit d’auteur sont aussi des biens d’expérience (Bomsel). Il faut voir un film pour savoir s’il est bon. Tous ces paramètres font que, dans un contexte d’émergence de marché, il est difficile pour le consommateur d’établir ses préférences et d’attribuer une valeur à une oeuvre (Yoo). Le titulaire peut le faire (prix = coût marginal de production + beurre pour haricots) tandis que, dans un contexte de biens publics et d’expérience, le consommateur peine à déterminer si le prix en vaut la chandelle. Si l’on ne peut établir un prix en tant qu’acheteur, et bien, pas de valeur, pas de marché, pas de richesse. Et on ignore et on oublie notre culture.

Il s’agit que, fut un certain temps et dans un autre contexte socio-économique (Outlet), ce combat contre cette spirale désastreuse de l’ignorance et l’oubli se nommait bibliothéconomie (un terme que j’affectionne beaucoup). On parle maintenant de sciences de l’information mais on néglige nous-même nos racines.

Mon analyse (personnelle cette fois, je n’en parle pas dans ma thèse) me porte à croire que nos élites culturelles, elles-mêmes qui réclament l’intervention de l’état pour soutenir leurs créations et qui lancent au brancard les outils socioéconomiques fins des exceptions au droit d’auteur, nuisent le plus au rayonnement de notre culture ! Leur message s’embrouille dans une quête de rentes de l’État sans réellement comprendre les dynamiques inhérentes à l’émergence de ce qu’elles demandent réellement : la juste valeur pour leurs labeurs.

Comment, donc, sortir de ce vortex socioéconomique malsain ? En réalité, il faut résoudre l’équation économique bien-public / bien -privé et expliquer clairement comment les institutions documentaires génèrent de la richesse sociale à partir des oeuvres de notre patrimoine, à leur juste valeur. (en fait, je pense bien que je vais devoir écrire un essai là dessus, le format du carnet ou de la thèse doctorale ne mène pas à des discussions pertinentes). La réponse immédiate est plus simple: il faut comprendre que ce que font les bibliothèques dans le cadre des exceptions est en réalité une exploration de ce que pourraient devenir les marchés de demain.

Donc, si j’étais titulaire d’oeuvres, je numériserai mon corpus (en faisant payer les bibliothèques/l’état/donateur pour ça) et j’imaginerai une offre par bouquets de collections où l’accès à un corpus d’oeuvres et les droits d’utilisations sont imbriquées. La formule est la suivante:

Richesse_bibliothéconomique =

Corpus_documentaire ( accès_numérique + contrat_utilisation )

Ou, plus simplement, offrez des contrats flexibles et des corpus numériques aux bibliothèques et vous vendrez plus de livres et de films à long terme. C’est le pari vertueux de la bibliothéconomie moderne pour éviter le vortex faustien d’un capitaliste miope.

Et hop, comme par magie, dans une génération ou deux, vous allez voir émerger des marchés foisonnants de culture québécoise. Mais, le capitaliste titulaire myope se posera sûrement la question suivante: si les bibliothèques offrent un accès numérique à mes oeuvres, comment est-ce que je pourrai en vendre ? L’ironie est que les québécois qui fréquentent le plus les bibliothèques sont aussi ceux qui dépensent le plus en livres !

(Mince alors, j’ai souvenir que BAnQ a effectué une étude démontrant que les québécois qui fréquentent le plus leur bibliothèques sont aussi ceux – celles en fait – qui dépensent le plus en livres – mais je ne retrace pas cette étude – y a-t-il une bibliothécaire dans la salle?)

Voilà la clé secrète de la voûte de la richesse : la culture est un bien économique dit public. Pensez à de la drogue plutôt qu’à du pain : plus on en consomme, plus on en veut. La satiété est un concept pour un bien privé de consommation. Il suffit donc de réfléchir à un contexte pour que le bien d’expérience – le même que celui du corpus de la bibliothèque numérique – recouvre une nouvelle valeur… tout est dans le design ou l’élaboration des paramètres technico-juridique (interface web, application pour tablette, contrats flexibles).

Par exemple, serait-il possible pour les administrateurs du projet Éléphant d’offrir une licence pour les collectivités pour que nos écoles et nos bibliothèques puissent faire découvrir notre cinéma patrimonial à tous ? S’il vous plaît !

Mon but est donc de bâtir un tel système juridico-technologique pour la diffusion d’oeuvres numériques protégées par le droit d’auteur aux bibliothèques, malgré ou (en dépit!) des jérémiades que j’entend !

 
Bibliographie
BELLEY, J.G., Le contrat entre droit, économie et société : étude sociojuridique des achats d’Alcan au Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean, Montreal, Yvon Blais, 1998

Le droit soluble : contributions québécoises à l’étude de l’internormativité, Paris, L.G.D.J., 1996

BOMSEL, O., Gratuit! : du déploiement de l’économie numérique, coll. «Collection Folio/actuel ;; 128; Variation: Collection Folio/actuel ;; 128.», Paris, Gallimard, 2007

L’économie immatérielle, coll. «NRF essais,; Variation: NRF essais.», Paris, Gallimard, 2010

LANDES, W.M. et R.A. POSNER, The economic structure of Intellectual Property Law, Cambridge, The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2003

LUHMANN, N., Risk : a sociological theory, New York, A. de Gruyter, 1993

Systèmes sociaux : esquisse d’une théorie générale, Québec, Presses de l’Université Laval, 2010

OST, F. et M. VAN DE KERCHOVE, De la pyramide au réseau? – Pour une théorie dialectique du droit, Bruxelles, Publications des Facultés universitaires Saint-Louis, 2002

POSNER, R.A., Economic analysis of law, 8, New York, Aspen Publishers, 2011

BELLEY, J.-G., «Le contrat comme vecteur du pluralisme juridique» dans OST, F. et M. VAN DE KERCHOVE (dir.), Le système juridique entre ordre et désordre, 13, Paris, Presses Universitaires de France, 1989, p. 181-185

OST, F. et M. VAN DE KERCHOVE, «Problématique générale» dans Le système juridique entre ordre et désordre, Paris, PUF, 1988, p. 19-32

BELLEY, J.-G., «La théorie générale des contrats. Pour sortir du dogmatisme», (1985) 26 Les Cahiers de droit

DEMSETZ, H., «The Private Production of Public Goods», (1970) 13 Journal of Law and Economics

«Toward a Theory of Property Rights», (1967) 57 The American Economic Review

LANDES, W.M. et R.A. POSNER, «An Economic Analysis of Copyright Law», (1989) 18 Journal of Legal Studies

«Indefinitely Renewable Copyright», (2003) 70 University of Chicago Law Review

LUHMANN, N., «Law As a Social System», (1988) 83 Nw. U. L. Rev. 136

ROCHER, G., «Pour une sociologie des ordres juridiques», (1988) 29 Les Cahiers de droit

SAMUELSON, P.A., «Aspects of Public Expenditure Theories», (1958) 40 The Review of Economics and Statistics

«Diagrammatic Exposition of a Theory of Public Expenditure», (1955) 37 The Review of Economics and Statistics

«The Pure Theory of Public Expenditure», (1954) 36 The Review of Economics and Statistics

YOO, C.S., «Copyright and Public Good Economics: A Misunderstood Relation», (2007) 155 University of Pennsylvania Law Review

Jugement Livre et édition Québec Universités Utilisation équitable

Copibec contre U. Laval : l’appel entendu le 23 novembre prochain

Copibec annonce, dans son bulletin corporatif, que la Cour d’appel entendra leur cause contre l’Université Laval le 23 novembre prochain.

Le juge Beaupré a rejeté en février dernier la certification du recours collectif de Copibec contre l’Université Laval au nom des auteur(e)s du Québec dans ce jugement:
Société québécoise de gestion collective des droits de reproduction (Copibec) c. Université Laval, 2016 QCCS 900 (CanLII), <http://canlii.ca/t/gnm6p>, consulté le 2016-06-28
Ayant lu ce jugement, il concerne bien plus les rouages des recours collectifs au Québec sans pour autant trop toucher au droit d’auteur.

Les dirigeants de Copibec ont d’ailleurs publié une lettre ouverte dans Le Devoir pour dénoncer la gestion des droits d’auteur à ladite université.

Commerce et Compagnies Europe Exceptions au droit d'auteur LLD Rapport et étude Utilisation équitable

Effets économiques des exceptions au droit d'auteur

Le site InfoJustice recense la publication d’une étude de l’initiative sur l’économie de l’innovation du Lisbon Counsil, intitulée « The 2015 Intellectual Property and Economic Growth Index:  Measuring the Impact of Exceptions and Limitations in Copyright on Growth, Jobs and Prosperity » et disponible en format PDF sous licence Creative Commons.

Rien de tel pour rendre un doctorant heureux qu’un rapport d’une quarantaine de pages proposant une analyse économétrique de diverses données nationales pour ordonner les performances économique de huit juridictions (pays) pour explorer le lien entre la performance économique et la force de leurs exceptions du droit d’auteur. 

Oui, je sais ce que vous allez dire. Olivier va encore nous parler des bénéfices économiques des exceptions, comme je l’ai fait dans le passé, entre autres, en ce qui concerne les les externalités positives de l’accès, l’impact sur les coûts d’information et la diminution des coûts de transactions… mais non, malgré que cette analyse semble indiquer un lien fort entre exceptions et industries d’envergure, l’intérêt réel et absolument fascinent de cette étude consiste en son approche méthodologique.

Primo, l’auteur, Benjamin Gibert, tente de mesurer avec précision, sur une échelle de 1 à 10, la « force » des exceptions au droit d’auteur de hui pays. Sans surprise, les États-Unis sont en tête avec un score de 8.13 et les Pays-Bas en queue de peloton avec 5.94. L’Allemagne figure au 3e rang, ce qui me surprend un peu, avec 7.50 (il va falloir que je me plonge dans les dédales de sa méthodologie pour savoir si l’auteur a bien saisi la différence entre exception et limitation au droit d’auteur).

Secondo, l’auteur plonge dans les entrailles des données statistiques nationales afin d’identifier les diverses séries pertinentes pour bâtir un modèle économétrique. La chose n’est pas évidente et j’ai peiné moi-même à naviguer ces sources. Quelle joie de voir ce travail accompli dans le cadre de cette étude.

Tertio, l’auteur nous offre les fruits d’un an de labeur – et il est évident que le travail accompli en a valu la chandelle. Il faut voir la bibliographie qui contient plusieurs textes fondateurs en plus de certains plus obscurs mais toujours pertinents pour en être convaincu.

Pour tout dire, il s’agit d’une excellente contribution au domaine de l’analyse économique du droit, par le biais de l’économétrie employant des données statistiques nationales et une comparaison des systèmes juridiques grâce à un ordre numérique.

Je serai bien curieux d’effectuer cette étude avec les données du Canada afin de mesurer son système juridique et analyser les résultats économiques. En fait, il faudrait probablement mesurer le Québec et le reste du Canada (ou ROC pour les intimes, pour Rest of Canada).

Également, il serait vraiment intéressant d’inclure des statistiques du réseau des bibliothèques pour voir comment les exceptions au droit d’auteur ainsi que les données économiques sont corrélées… Il s’agit-là d’un autre thème de mes recherches que je n’ose pas encore attaquer de front tant et aussi longtemps que je n’ai pas terminé d’écrire ma thèse…

En fait, l’auteur ne fait que relever des liens de corrélation – à juste titre que l’outil employé (données statistiques nationales ) ne permet pas de confirmer un lien de causalité. Je crois qu’en arrière des données employées se cache une dynamique très simple: plus les états financent le réseau de bibliothèques (et la consommation de culture en général), plus le régime d’exception est fort. Inversement, plus un pays investit dans la création culturelle, plus le régime d’exception est faible.

(Voyez-vous la dichotomie entre création et consommation ? on finance la consommation par les bibliothèques, les quotas de contenu sur les ondes télévisuelles et radiophonique, les écoles tandis que l’on finance la consommation avec des programmes de subventions aux créateurs et à l’industrie).

J’aimerai bien, un jour (probablement après mon doctorat), tester ces hypothèses…

Mais, dans l’intérim, si les sujets de l’analyse économique du droit, les exceptions au droit d’auteur et le droit comparé vous intéresse, l’étude de Benjamin Gibert en vaut le coup: « The 2015 Intellectual Property and Economic Growth Index:  Measuring the Impact of Exceptions and Limitations in Copyright on Growth, Jobs and Prosperity » 

(Et oui, il est bon d’avoir des données probantes concernant les revendications de groupes sociaux quant à la réforme du droit d’auteur).

Canada Conférence CultureLibre.ca Droits des citoyens Utilisation équitable

Conférence à l'Université Laval à Québec ce jeudi 15h30

Si vous êtes à Québec ce jeudi après-midi, je vous invite à ma conférence sur le droit d’auteur, dont les détails sont disponible sur cette page du journal universitaire Le Fil:

Pour discuter de l’évolution du droit d’auteur, le Café numérique «Quel droit d’auteur pour un 21e siècle numérique?» recevra Olivier Charbonneau, bibliothécaire à l’Université Concordia. Cette activité est organisée par le CRILCQ, le Laboratoire Ex Situ et la Bibliothèque de l’Université Laval.
Jeudi 9 avril, à 15h30, au local 4229 du pavillon Jean-Charles-Bonenfant. Entrée libre.

Voir aussi l’affice de la présentation, sur le site du Laboratoire Ex Situ.